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1.    Applications to wind up companies. 2nded. By French, Derek
This books is intended to provide a detailed statement of the law on applications to wind up companies in England and Wales.  It is concerned primarily with registered companies, but also deals with all the various entities that can be wound up in the same manner as registered companies, including foreign companies, other unregistered companies and insolvent partnerships.


2.    Clinical Law in SA, 2nded. By De Klerk et al
All South African universities now offer a course in clinical law.  Such courses are mainly called ‘clinical law’ or ‘clinical legal education’. The term “clinical law” can be confusing.  It is not a separate branch of law in the way that subjects, like contract, delict or family law, are. It is rather descriptive of a method of teaching law. The subject matter of the book is the theoretical component of the various legal skills which the course aims to impart. This edition has retained much of the first edition.  It had included three new chapters: An introduction by Judge MohomedNavsa, A chapter on numeracy skills and a chapter on practice management.

3.    Basic trial advocacy skills. By Palmer, Robin and Mcquoid-Mason, David
The aim of this book is to serve as a basic introduction to trial advocacy for new lawyers.  The focus is on essential skills and tactics required for effective advocacy in civil and criminal trials.  In addition, the rules of conduct with which trail lawyers are expected to comply are discussed.

4.    Extradition and Mutual Legal Assistance Handbook. 2nded. By Jones, John R.W.D
The law of extradition used to be regarded as an arcane subject, a little-known speciality.  The force of many factors has transformed it.  The law of European Convention on Human Rights has given a new edge to extradition: a challenge to extradition’s legal limits.  Much crime is international, and knows no boundaries: fueled by the internet, email and other technologies, it exerts a further challenge, demanding that extradition procedures be swift and efficient.  The law of extradition is no longer and arcane subject, and certainly aught not any longer to be a little-known speciality.

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